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Previous Survey Results

These are the results of the survey about Regenerators for March 2011.  There were 25 responses.

Question 1:

Rev. Robert Stirling applied for the patent of what we now call the "regenerator" in 1816. This patent was an improvement to the hot-air engine that was already in use. In the years that followed, the name "Stirling Engine" has been applied to many hot-air engines that do not use a regenerator.

The only engines that deserve to be called Stirling Engines are those with a regenerator.520%
I'm OK with using the term "Stirling Engine" as a generic name for most closed cycle hot air engines.1456%
I don't really care one way or the other. This is not an issue for me.624%

Question 2:

Regenerator Materials: Some prefer to build a regenerator from a highly conductive material such as copper or aluminum so that it will collect and release heat quickly. Others prefer to use a slower conductor like stainless steel or steel in order to avoid overheating caused by thermal shorts.

The best regenerators are made from highly conductive material such as copper or aluminum. Thermal shorts are addressed through engineering solutions.
3
12%
The best regenerators are made from slower conductors such as stainless steel in order to manage thermal shorts.
3
12%
The ideal material will be determined by a number of factors including engine design, regenerator design, and the operating temperature of your engine.
11
44%
I do not have enough experience with this issue to be able to offer an opinion.
832%

Question 3:

Should a regenerator be part of every design for small desktop models of hot-air engines?

Yes. Every hot-air engine will see an improvement in performance if a regenerator is part of the design.
7
28%
No. Some small engine designs do not benefit from a regenerator.
11
44%
I don't really know.
728%

Question 4:

What is your level of experience with regnerators and Stirling Engines?

I have built one or more hot-air engines without a regenerator and they work well.
14
61%
I have added a regenerator to a working design and it caused a noticeable improvement in performance.
5
22%
I don't know what a regenerator is or what it does.
3
13%
All of my designs include a regenerator.
6
26%
I never use a regenerator in my designs.
1
4%
People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.

Question 5:

Where did your knowledge about regenerators for Stirling Engines come from?

I have read the book, "The Regenerator and the Stirling Engine" by Alan J. Organ.
3
12%
I have researched plans and designs on the Internet.
10
40%
I have experimented and built Stirling Engines with regenerators.
5
20%
I have read other books that discuss regenerator design for Stirling Engines.
12
48%
I have learned from friends and associates (or from online discussion groups).
7
28%
I don't claim to know much of anything about regenerators.
6
24%
People may select more than one checkbox, so percentages may add up to more than 100%.



These are the final results for the Stirling Engine Builder's Survey for February 2011.  


The survey consists of four simple questions:

    What type(s) of Stirling engines do you like to build?

    Have you ever assembled a Stirling engine kit?

    When building a Stirling engine: 
        I usually follow the plans provided by someone else.
        I usually build my own original designs.
        Other

    How many working Stirling engines do you currently own?

There were 65 responses.  Here are the results:




Some of the submissions for the "other" category are listed here:
  • I wish to design my own
  • follow plans but do deviate
  • would like to make one but not sure which one.
  • I wish to build
  • I have built a 3/4" scale live steam traction engine.
  • N/A  plan to if i can find materials
  • just looking now
  • Not build yet, looking for info
  • Adapt/Combine Ideas 





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